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Jennifer Short

Does a Domestic Partner Have the Same Rights as a Spouse?

Domestic partnerships generally don't have the same rights as married couples when it comes to estate planning. The state in which you live, and maybe even the city or county, largely determine domestic partnership rights. Because domestic partnership laws vary so widely, it is important to consult an experienced estate planning attorney. They can help you understand the laws that apply to your situation, and the estate planning you must do to ensure that your significant other will have the rights and benefits you want them to have.

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Gregory S. DuPont

How much can you gift a family member in 2022?

The federal tax code has very specific rules about how much you are allowed to give to others each year—and over the course of your lifetime—in the form of a gift. But not every gift is subject to tax. Learn how you can avoid gift tax via tuition and medical exemptions.

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Gregory S. DuPont

What is a Qualified Personal Residence Trust?

Americans have enjoyed historically high estate tax exemption rates for the last twenty years. Such high exemption amounts have kept many of them from needing to seek out help from an estate tax professional. However, the exemption amount is likely to fall. If you have a high net worth, it's important to be aware of tax planning strategies, such as the Qualified Personal Residence Trust. A QPRT is an irrevocable trust that is designed to hold a taxpayer's home, with the benefit being to save money on taxes during your lifetime and when you pass away.

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Braden A. Blumenstiel

Can You Settle a Car Accident Claim Without a Lawyer?

A common question people have after a car accident is whether or not they need to hire an attorney. Most lawyers will not tell you that many minor car accidents can be settled without their help. If your injuries didn't require medical treatment, you didn't miss any work, you didn't need to buy things for your injuries, and the other party was clearly at fault, you likely don't need an attorney.

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Gregory S. DuPont

How to Protect Yourself Against Claims of Self-Dealing as a Trustee

As a fiduciary, a trustee must act in the best interest of the trust's beneficiaries. Trustees are prohibited from self-dealing. They cannot use the trust's assets for their own benefit as opposed to the beneficiaries' benefit. Self-dealing can be much harder to identify in practice and is often done accidently. There are some safe harbor rules that can you can follow to prevent yourself from getting sued.

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Braden A. Blumenstiel

Damage Caps and Limits on Personal Injury Compensation

If you have been injured due to another’s misconduct, you may be wondering: Are there any limitations on the amount of money I can receive in compensation? In some cases, there is no cap on the amount of compensation a person can receive. In others, there are limits on how much money can be awarded. This depends on the type of case, as well as the nature and severity of your injuries. It is important to be aware of damages caps that apply to your case so you can accurately manage and plan your finances.

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Gregory S. DuPont

How to File a Transfer-On-Death Deed in Ohio

If a living trust doesn't make sense for your situation, but you still want to avoid the probate process, a transfer-on-death (TOD) deed may be the solution. When you die, the TOD deed (also know as a beneficiary deed) works to automatically transfer the property to your named beneficiaries without having to go through probate. If you change your mind during your lifetime about whom you have named as beneficiaries in the TOD deed, you can amend or revoke it at any time.

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Gregory S. DuPont

What to Know about NFTs

The sale of multimillion-dollar NFTs over the last year has prompted growing interest in them—and plenty of questions. Namely, what exactly are NFTs, how are they used, and why would anyone be interested in them?

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Gregory S. DuPont

What to Do When a Family Member Dies

If you've recently lost a family member or other loved one, you're probably feeling overwhelmed and confused about what to do next. While some things can be put off until later, other steps should be taken as soon as possible. Once you've begun the grieving process and taken care of any initial concerns, it is time to begin the estate administration or trust administration process. We will help guide you through the entire legal process so you an your family members can focus on healing.

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