Automobile Accident Injury FAQs

 
How will my bills be paid after the accident?

Payment for your medical bills following an automobile accident will depend on whether you have health insurance, medical payment insurance, or no insurance.

  • Health insurance: If you have health insurance, you can submit the bills to your health insurance company. The bills will be paid. However, your health insurance company will have what is known as a “subrogated lien”. Through their subrogated lien, the medical insurance company will want reimbursement of the money they spent on your medical treatment. They will seek this reimbursement from the settlement money you receive from the person who caused the accident.
  • Medical payment insurance: Automobile insurance companies offer a type of insurance called “medical payment insurance” (a.k.a. “med pay”). It is not automatically part of someone’s automobile insurance. However, if you have med pay insurance, you can use that to pay off medical bills as they are incurred. Similar to health insurance, however, your med pay provider will have a subrogated lien for which they will seek reimbursement from the settlement money you receive from the person who caused the accident.
  • No Insurance: It is not unusual that a person involved in an automobile accident does not have health insurance or medical payment insurance. Unfortunately, under such circumstances, the medical providers who treated their injuries often seek payment directly from the injured person. If ignored, those bills can be sent to bill collectors. Fortunately, if the injured party is represented by an experienced personal injury attorney, that attorney can frequently contact the medical providers and convince them to refrain from sending the bills to collections until the claim has been settled. Money from the settlement would then be used to pay off those medical provider bills.
What happens if I miss work due to my injuries?

Regrettably, it is common that people miss work after an automobile accident. Some people have personal time off (PTO) they can use while they are off work to ensure they don’t miss out on wage payment. Others, however, have no personal time off. For those individuals, they simply don’t get paid for the days they can’t work due to the accident. Regardless of whether you had to use personal time off or simply were paid for the time you missed from work following an accident, you’re entitled to compensation equal to the amount of time you missed work. An experienced personal injury attorney can help ensure you maximize the amount of compensation you receive for any time you had to miss work following an accident.

Will I have to pay out of pocket for help from an attorney?

The simple answer to this question is “no”. For people injured in automobile accidents, the attorney will typically work on what is known as a “contingency fee” basis. That means the attorney’s fee will be based on the amount of money obtained for the injured party. Specifically, the attorney will receive a certain percentage of the amount of money received by the injured party. Typically, that percentage is 33.33%.

Why is the insurance company refusing to admit fault?

It is standard practice that the insurance company for the person who caused the accident will not admit fault. Under Ohio law, the injured party is responsible for proving who caused the accident as well as the damages resulting from that accident. Consequently, the insurance companies see no reason or benefit to admitting fault unless forced to. An experienced personal injury attorney can help cut through the red tape on this issue and get the insurance companies to admit fault earlier so the injured person’s claim can be resolved as quickly as possible.

Why is my own insurance company paying my medical bills?

Who pays your medical bills following the accident depends on whether you have insurance and, if you do, what type of insurance you have. If you have medical insurance, your medical insurance company will typically pay your medical bills following an automobile accident. Sometimes people have a special type of automobile insurance called medical payment insurance (a.k.a. “med pay”). Regardless of whether the injured person has medical insurance or med pay, whatever insurance company pays for the medical bills following the accident will have a “subrogated lien” for which they will seek reimbursement when the injured party receives a settlement payment.


Automobile Accident Injury SAQs (Should Ask Questions)

Before you hire an attorney to help you receive compensation for automobile accident injuries make sure to ask them these questions:

  • How long have you been practicing law?
  • How many years have you been handling automobile accidents?
  • What percentage of your practice do automobile accident cases make up?
  • What is your fee structure?

In order to ensure that you will receive the full compensation in which you are entitled to, make sure you hire an attorney that specializes in, and has plenty of experience in, automobile accident cases.